soontobereleased

 

 

 

Greetings from Laura

The last few weeks we have been focused on building relationships, asking for what you really want, and taking stock of both your personal and career ‘non-negotiable” lists.  How are we doing?

Non-Negotiable Worksheet  – worksheet to help identify what’s important (imperative) in your professional, personal and private life.  This list will be used in this week’s lesson in taking control of your own performance reviews.

Do these feelings sound familiar?
  • Made it through my yearly evaluation with only one ‘below expectations’ – the overall evaluation was ‘average’.
  • I was prepared for the absolute worst.
  • Someone who had their eval earlier that day handed in their resignation immediately after getting their eval

Is this the way you really want to approach your performance review?  Take the time NOW to visualize what you really want your performance review to report.  Then set upon a plan of action to achieve those SMART goals.  You will be much more successful if you use the work-year to actually create your perfect performance review, versus just letting it happen without your design input.

Other things to incorporate:
  • YOU initiate quarterly reviews of your performance (if going well — more frequent if you are not on target)
  • YOU articulate your performance goals to your manager
  • YOU keep track of your achievements throughout the year that illustrate your accomplishments of these goals
  • YOU ask your manager on what projects and opportunities he/she  commends for you to accomplish your performance review goals.

Most people act as if  their career goals and accomplishments are their manager’s responsibility.  This is actually a false premise.  If you are interested in more tips on how to take more control of your professional development and career, please check out my on-line coaching academy series.

In the last 12 weeks we have discussed various time management, soft-skills in business networking, work-life balance strategies and career maintenance techniques.  This is where all these techniques come together to design your ideal performance appraisal.

We talk more about how to incorporate this philosophy into the real-world professional environment in my on-line coaching academy series.

In my “IT Professional Development Toolkit” series, I go through the: who, what, where, when and how; of all of these things. This DVD package is scheduled to be released in May.

Feel free to share this newsletter with your family, friends and colleagues. My business relies on satisfied clients as the primary source of new business, and your referrals are both welcome and most sincerely appreciated!

Enjoy!

Warmly,

Laura Lee Rose

Nothing is going wrong here.  Everything is unfolding perfectly.  Just keep at it.

   Laura Lee Rose


  Lesson Number 12

Designing your performance reviews

 

Most of us have felt disappointed with one or more of our performance reviews.  Most of us have had some anxiety directly before our meeting.  Did you often brace yourself for the absolute worst?

Are those feelings in the past?  If not, would you like them to be in the past?

This week, we’re focusing on designing your own performance review.  We will be using many of the skills we have been developing in the past 12 weeks.  If you have not been putting into practice those previous techniques, it’s not too late.  Start NOW.

  Take the time NOW to visualize what you really want your performance review to report.  Then set upon a plan of action to achieve those SMART goals.  You will be much more successful if you use the work-year to actually create your perfect performance review, versus just letting it happen without your design input.

Other things to incorporate:

  • YOU create your SMART goals with your imperative list in mind.
  • YOU initiate quarterly reviews of your performance (if going well — more frequent if you are not on target)
  • YOU articulate your performance goals to your manager
  • YOU keep track of your achievements throughout the year that illustrate your accomplishments of these goals
  • YOU ask your manager on what projects and opportunities he/she  commends for you to accomplish your performance review goals.

Most people act as if  their career goals and accomplishments are their manager’s responsibility.  This is actually a false premise.  If you are interested in more tips on how to take more control of your professional development and career, please check out my on-line coaching academy series.

 


Real-world Scenario Discussion

The above steps seem simple enough, but how would we incorporate in the real-world?  Below are some common professional situations:

In this exercise, we’re using some typical employee well-rounded goals (imperative lists) into their career plans.

  • I want more time with my family
  • I want to be able to take my vacations this year
  • I want to regularly work 40 hours a week.
  • I want to work on more high-profile and next generation products
  • I want to be considered the expert in a critical company department
  • I don’t want to fear being fired or laid off
  • I don’t want to be afraid of a company re-organization
  • I want to receive an “Exceptional” performance review or an “exceeds expectation” rating.
  • I want a promotion within 2 years.

Be self-aware of any hidden agenda or expectations.

If you already feel the above list is unattainable, then it will be unattainable to you.  For those that feel these are achievable will accomplish them.

Create some SMART goals that allows this mission:

  • I want more time with my family

Identify some opportunities for flexible work hours.  For instance, if you are responsible for working with your global siblings in India, China, or other time zones,  create a flexible work schedule that allows you to work 8 hours a day during their time zones.  This may mean working earlier in the morning and/or later in the evening; leaving the afternoon and early evening free for the family.

Identify some opportunities to work 4 days a week and/or compensation time for hours over 40 hours a week.

  • I want to be able to take my vacations this year

Plan out your summer, fall, spring vacation schedule now.  Even if you don’t know exactly what you will be doing on these vacations, block out the time on your calendar NOW.  Report your vacation schedule to your managers and project managers NOW — so that they can schedule/manage the project schedules around this known resource allocation spike.

  • I want to regularly work 40 hours a week.

Take responsibility for your own calendar.  Be your own time manager.  Use the time management tips we have been discussing in these lessons to define what you reasonably do in a 40 hour work week.  Schedule your day as a 6 hour day (versus 8 hour day), so that you have the buffer to absorb a certain amount of spontaneity and emergencies.  Use the Sprint and Buffer techniques previously discussed.  Review the 12TricksToRealisticScheduling Presentation Notes.pdf eBook for more tips. (Need to be enrolled in this program for the actual files).

  • I want to work on more high-profile and next generation products

Create your individual professional development plan that allows you to acquire the skill set for the next technology.

Schedule several Brown Bag Lunch series and/or Conference presentation on the next generation technology

Volunteer your services to sibling departments that are working on the more high-profile projects

Volunteer to help the technical support staff on customer calls on the high-profile products, to get to know the high-profile clients

Create your INP  (Individual Network Plan) to include your companies global departments, affiliates and clients

  • I want to be considered the expert in a critical company department

Define opportunities to expose and gain expertise:  write articles, blogs, presentation, brown bag lunches, facilitate educational chat groups

Volunteer to bring in experts to train and discuss new concepts and technology

Attend professional associations and organizational meetings on similar topics

Volunteer to speak at outside professional organizations or webinars.

Conduct interview for your company newsletters and blogs.  Create your interview list around this technology.

  • I don’t want to fear being fired or laid off

Understand the company mission statement and business goals

Everything you accomplish, tie it to the company bottom line and mission statement

Continue to develop your business network with your Individual Network Plan  (need to enroll to receive the worksheet).

Self-evaluate your current goals and progress.  Request quarterly evaluations with your management chain.

Continue to market yourself in the appropriate way.

  • I don’t want to be afraid of a company re-organization

Be an agent of opportunity.  Keep your resume up to date.  Keep an open mind on other positions that feed your goals.

Continue to market yourself in the appropriate way both inside and out of this particular company.

Review the companies’ job listing as well as other job opportunities.  Look at the attributes that most of those companies are requesting and include them in your transferable skill table.

Review the lesson on transferable skills as well as the worksheet.

  • I want to receive an “Exceptional” performance review or an “exceeds expectation” rating.

Understand the attributes of an ‘exceptional rating’.  Get them in writing in your PBC  (Personal Business Commitments).

Once you get them in writing and signed off by your manager, continually work toward focus on these goals.

The moment you see your manager’s work requests do not match the above goals, meet with your manager to re-assess and re-write your PBC.(need to enroll in class to receive the PBC worksheet).

Verify that everything that you are spending your time on — supports the ‘Exceptional rating” that you and your manager agreed to IN WRITING.

It is important to have it in writing, such that any changes in management still supports this written agreement.

Request  co-worker’s ‘thank you’ notes and recognition letters (with copies to your manager) when you assist a sibling department

Keep an achievement folder throughout the year

  • I want a promotion within 2 years.

Create your Personal Development Plan to include this 2 year promotion

Understand the steps that are required to get a promotion within two years

Continue to review these attributes in your manager’s one-on-one meetings and quarterly review

Know where you stand at every step:

Understand, at every step, where you stand on these goals so that you can immediate course-correct when necessary.

Review all these plans with your manager.

Take full advantage of your one-on-one and quarterly meetings with your managers and management chain.

Don’t keep your career plans a secret.  Ask for what you really want.  Make your manager a co-creator and collaborator (versus a judge).


Book Recommendations for this week:

For a different view on leadership, check out the following books:

For a complete list of suggested books, please <click here>:


 

Suggested Weekly Schedule

no more than 10 minutes a day

This 12 week comprehensive package is being transitioned into a 12-week course of audios, videos, webinars,  and discussion group forum (scheduled for general release in May)

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info@vconferenceonline.com


 

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